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To recall everything I loved from the Dario Argento’s Suspiria ruined my expectations when I saw the remake by writer David Kajganich and director Luca Guadagnino. They tried very hard to condense key points from Argento's trilogy into one product, and the result is a very bloated film. The update of the mythology was good, but to toss in the extra subplots to make it relevant in a historical context made the runtime longer than it should have been. The fact the screenplay divides the movie into five parts is the first failing. Traditionally, cinematic narratives are fashioned into three to stay simple. With the home video release coming in January (digital release on the 15th and a physical release on the 29th), hitting the pause button will be very welcomed!

Panos Cosmatos' Mandy, A Movie Review

Monday, 01 October 2018 19:34
Published in Movie Reviews

* Spoiler Alert

It's not too late to go see Panos Cosmatos' Mandy. This film should stay in theatres till at least mid-October, and will keep most horror film enthusiasts looking for a visceral experience sated. When Mandy Bloom (Andrea Riseborough) is critical to the plot, the sequence of events that happen will no doubt leave one particular lumberjack (not Paul Bunyan) to a brink of madness. He's a nobody about to become a somebody (more on this later). This woman is a very forlorn soul. Riseborough is the perfect choice in the role, offering pathos to a very troubled character. Because of events that occurred in the past, she prefers to live a life in isolation; her feelings for Red (Nicolas Cage) runs deep. The two are soul mates. One day, on her walk home, a priest of sorts takes a liking to her and orders his minions to her kidnap her.

2016 Victoria Film Festival 

Fri, Feb 12th 8:45pm

The Vic Theatre

808 Douglas St,
Victoria, BC

The movie Girl in the Photographs fondly recalls films like Halloween in its no holds barred approach to possibly reigniting the slasher genre. This detail makes this film worth noting. It’s directed by Nick Simon, a relative newcomer to the scene and it was the last movie that Wes Craven (Last House on the Left, A Nightmare on Elm Street) had his hands on as an executive producer. Most of his films have a trademark style to them and while it’s sad he’s passed on, the lessons Simon learned will most likely carry on in the next projects he works on within the horror film genre.

What We Do In Shadows, A Review

Monday, 23 February 2015 17:13
Published in Movie Reviews

Special Week-long
Screening
in Victoria, BC

Feb 27 - Mar 5
The Odeon Theatre
780 Yates


The Vic Theatre

Modern life is very rough for the ancient vampire. In Wellington, New Zealand, just What We Do in the Shadows presents a comical look into what life is truly like for these creatures of the night in a more humanist kind of way. They allowed a small crew of cameramen to follow them around to record their antics and to see them acknowledged time to time gives this movie an air of authenticity that can be appreciated. When the film is presented as a mockumentary, the laughs are well earned, and some horror lore enthusiasts will recognize the world that these creatures, along with the werewolves and zombies, belong in.

Fans of minimalist horror will love what’s created in a simple tale of terror, It Follows and to find where it will screen next requires carefully paying attention to this movie’s own Facebook page for where it will play next.

Students of the occult will want to figure out what the entity is and to figure out what the monster represents can be studied in film analysis class but is any of the above really needed at all? Most likely not, but in a film that certainly delves into themes about sexual awakening, this tribute to 80’s sentimentality certainly delivers the thrills in an effective manner that even John Carpenter would approve of.

The Victoria Film Festival returns for another year with a wide collection of films, thrillers and chillers for film-buffs, heavy metal and comedy enthusiasts to enjoy. Ron James of Black Fly and Mark McKinney of Kids in the Hall fame will be here to talk about their careers, For McKinney, a screening of the classic Brain Candy, follows afterwards. The shenanigans begin 11:30am on both days, Feb 7th and 8th.

The ABCs of Death 2 Plan to Slay Halloween!

Wednesday, 29 October 2014 18:40
Published in Movie Reviews

It’s difficult to add to the alphabet, but fairly soon, maybe the ABC’s of Death will create a periodic table of artists, directors and producers from around the world who either are or can become today’s new masters of horror. The sequel, the ABC’s of Death 2 adds to the list with names like Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado (Big Bad Wolves), Jen and Sylvia Soska (American Mary), Steve Kostanski (Manborg) and Vincenzo Natali (Splice). This video will be released to select theatres and Video on Demand on Halloween, offering, quite literally a “Nexus” of delights for the night (skip to N to find a treat).

Missed Opportunities in "Annabelle," A Movie Review

Monday, 27 October 2014 02:17
Published in Movie Reviews

Edgar Allan Poe crafted a better supernatural drama in his poem, Annabel Lee, than with director John R. Leonetti’s studio made product, Annabelle. This horror film about a haunted doll attempting to ruin the love John and Mia Gordon (Ward Horton and Annabelle Wallis) have for each other and their newborn daughter, Lea, is not without some problems. Although there is a slight connection with The Conjuring in this film, that importance is never explained. Instead, the way this film dwells upon a church sermon to guide the plot ruins the film.

What's "I, Frankenstein"? A Movie Review

Friday, 24 January 2014 00:00
Published in Movie Reviews

The Modern Prometheus has issues and some of that gets explored in I, Frankenstein. While this film tries to follow after the events from Mary Shelley’s masterpiece novel, Frankenstein, the events do not continue in that universe. The tale and focus shifts to that of a comic book one, completely toned down by writer/director Stuart Beattie for a general PG-13 rated audience to enjoy. Fans of the graphic novel of the same name most likely will appreciate this film more.

Charles Darwin might not survive naming the horrors found in Blood Glacier (Blutgletscher), an Austrian film by writer Benjamin Hessler and director Marvin Kren. Together, they are known for films like Rammbock (2010) and Schautag (2009). If his last film is any indication, perhaps this filmmaker has a fondness for creating terrors formed by viruses. In the Alps, just what may lurk underneath the snow is definitely not the abominable snowman! Instead, as the title implies, there’s a glacier that is shrinking and revealing a red like algae that’s going to spell doom for the scientists studying the effects of climate change.

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